Hickory Ridge Village Center Redevelopment

Hickory Ridge Village Center Redevelopment

On December 7, 2015, Kimco realty notified the Hickory Ridge Village Board of its intent to redevelop the Hickory Ridge Village Center. This marks the beginning of the lengthy “Village Center Redevelopment-Major” process developers are required to follow according to the  Howard County Zoning Regulations, Section 125.J.

Since that initial meeting, Kimco Realty has hosted the required Village Center Concept Planning Workshop, which was held on February 18 at Atholton High School. Meeting minutes and Kimco’s written responses to the comments and questions received at that meeting will be made available once the Village Board has received them.

The next step in the Village Center Redevelopment process will happen on March 23, 2016. Kimco will host the first of two required pre-submission community meetings at 7 pm in the Atholton High School cafeteria. Residents are encouraged to attend, as this is one of your key opportunities to comment on Kimco’s proposed plan and suggest changes to improve it. After this meeting, a second pre-submission meeting will be scheduled, at which Kimco will present their revisions to the redevelopment plan based on community input.

If you live in Hickory Ridge, please do what you can to participate in the redevelopment process. Attend community meetings and share your views with the Village Board. You are being given the opportunity to have an impact on determining the future of the Hickory Ridge Village Center. Seize it!

If you have questions about the redevelopment process, please visit our dedicated web page for more information. You can also direct questions to the Village Manager by phone (410-730-7327) or e-mail.

 

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Do You Really Need to Fertilize?

Soil Sample BagsBy Deborah Wessner, Hickory Ridge Watershed Advisory Committee

In preparation for the fall fertilizing season, the Watershed Resident Advisory Committee for Hickory Ridge suggests you first determine how much and what type of nutrients your lawn needs.  Much like a blood analysis for a person, a soil analysis can indicate what levels of chemicals and minerals are present in a lawn, and what type of nutrients may need to be added. Your lawn may already be rich in nutrients, so why pay for expensive fertilizer if you don’t need to?

A soil analysis can be provided for your lawn, FOR FREE, thanks to a program provided by Columbia Association. Soil sample collection bags are available at the Hickory Ridge Village Center office and can be returned to the same office once you have collected your samples (a ten minute task!)  Soil samples you collect from your lawn will be analyzed by a recognized laboratory in Delaware , and the results provided back to you by mail or email.  If you are unable to collect samples yourself, please contact the Hickory Ridge Village office at 410-730-7327 and we will ask a watershed volunteer to set up an appointment to collect the sample for you.

Remember, fall is the best time to fertilize but Maryland law requires homeowners to complete any fertilizing by November 15, so get your soil sample submitted today!

 

Ask Covenant Cat – Fifteen Day Letters

Dear Covenant Cat:

What is a 15-day letter? I frequently see this on Village Board meeting agendas.                                   

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Covenant Cat is ready for beach weather. Are you?

-Confused in Clemens

Dear Confused:

A 15-day letter is the final stage of the village’s covenant enforcement process before a case is forwarded to the Columbia Association (CA) for legal action. Once the Covenant Advisor has sent 3 letters to a homeowner and the covenant violation remains, she then brings the case to the Village Board for their review. The Board then decides whether or not to send the case to the CA  Architectural Resource Committee (ARC), which is made up of Covenant Advisors from all Columbia villages and several CA staff members, including CA’s General Counsel. If the ARC accepts the case, CA can then take legal action against the property owner. This may include placing a flag on the owner’s assessment file (which means the violation must be resolved before the property can be sold), taking the owner to court, or entering onto the property to perform maintenance. Once CA has accepted a covenant case, they can also deny the owner access to CA facilities and programs, and the village can prevent the owner from voting in a village election. Still confused? Call the village office and they can help. And please remind the Village Manager to bring home some catnip, ok?

xoxo— Covenant Cat

Covenant Cat: Compliance Concerns

This periodic “advice column” addresses common questions about the Hickory Ridge village covenants and other property maintenance concerns. To keep it interesting, your questions are answered by a local feline who is surprisingly well-versed in covenant issues. This cat may or may not be an overweight orange tabby named Boo Boo that lives with the Village Manager. Send your burning questions to jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org.

Dear Covenant Cat:

I just put my house on the market and my real estate agent says I need a Letter of Compliance. But I’m planning to sell my house as is — do I still need one?

                                   -Seller on Satinwood

Boo Boo Shoe (2)

Covenant Cat carefully inspects a dirty shoe while he sleeps.

Dear Seller :

A Letter of Compliance is not required to sell your home, but it is a very valuable tool fur home sellers in Hickory Ridge. This letter, issued by the Covenant Advisor, verifies that your purroperty is in compliance with the Hickory Ridge Covenants.

To obtain a Letter of Compliance, the purroperty owner must complete a brief request form, which is available on the village’s web site or at their office. The Covenant Advisor will visit your purroperty, inspecting the home’s exterior fur any maintenance issues and/or unapurroved exterior alterations. If the home is non-compliant, she will issue a Letter of Non-Compliance describing the violations. Once these have been addressed, she will reinspect the purroperty and issue the Letter of Compliance. This is a free service provided by the village.

Any  covenant violations at your home become the responsibility of the new owner when the purroperty changes hands, so savvy home buyers often request a Letter of Compliance from the seller as part of their purrchase contract. For this reason, many agents tell sellers that it is “required” fur homes sold in Columbia. However, there is no legal requirement to have a Letter of Compliance unless the buyer has placed it in their contract.

If you are selling your home “as is,” you may still want to request a Letter of Compliance. If a Letter of Non-Compliance is issued, you can share it with the buyers so they have a record of the violations they will inherit when they purrchase your home. Good luck!

Hugs and Kittens,

Covenant Cat

Covenant Cat: Expecting Inspections?

Covenant Cat

Covenant Cat inspects the back of his eyelids after responding to today’s inquiry.

This periodic “advice column” addresses common questions about the Hickory Ridge village covenants and other property maintenance concerns. To keep it interesting, your questions are answered by a local feline who is surprisingly well-versed in covenant issues. This cat may or may not be an overweight orange tabby named Boo Boo that lives with the Village Manager. Send your burning questions to jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org.

Dear Covenant Cat:

I think several houses on my street look run down. When will the village office conduct an annual inspection of homes for covenant violations?

-Impatient on Iron Frame

Dear Impatient:

Unfurtunately, the village office does NOT conduct regular inspections of properties in Hickory Ridge. They simply don’t have the time or resources to do so. The covenant enforcement purrocess in Hickory Ridge is “complaint-driven.” This means that the village relies on residents to report covenant violations to the office. If you report a possible covenant violation, the village office must follow up on it. All complaints are considered anonymouse, and you can infurm the village of violations in writing, by phone, by e-mail, or in purrson at the village office. Once the office receives a complaint, the Covenant Advisor will visit the property in question to verify that a violation exists. If so, the covenant enforcement purrocess begins. Please don’t wait to report a problem; the sooner you let the village office know about violations, the more quickly they can be addressed. Lingering violations make the neighborhood look unsightly.

Ask Covenant Cat – Cracks in the Sidewalk

Cov Cat and Friend

Ever vigilant, Covenant Cat and his friend scan the sidewalk carefully for any cracks caused by street trees.

This periodic “advice column” addresses common questions about the Hickory Ridge village covenants and other property maintenance concerns. To keep it interesting, your questions are answered by a local feline who is surprisingly well-versed in covenant issues. This cat may or may not be an overweight orange tabby named Boo Boo that lives with the Village Manager. Send your burning questions to jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org.

Dear Covenant Cat:

Settle a bet for me—my neighbor says I have to maintain the sidewalk in front of my house—I say it’s the County’s job. Who is correct?

                                   -Determined on Dovecote

Dear Determined:

UnFURtunately, this is a complicated issue that can confuse many residents. The responsibility for maintenance of the Howard County right-of-way (the sidewalk and the strip of grass between that and the street) is shared between the homeowner and the County. Homeowners must mow the grass, rake any leaves, and remove snow from the sidewalk. The County is responsible for major sidewalk repairs and County-planted trees in this area (commonly known as “street trees.”).

If street trees are affecting your purrsonal property you can trim them yourself as outlined in “the Massachusetts Rule” for tree trimming (Google it!). If major tree work needs to be done, call the Howard County Bureau of Highways to request it. If your sidewalk or driveway has been damaged due to tree roots, the County will fix it IF a street tree is the cause. If the problem tree is on your property, you are responsible for the repair. As I said before—it’s complicated. If you have a purroblem in the County right-of-way and aren’t sure what to do, call the village office. Village staff can help you determine who is responsible and can advocate on your behalf if necessary. As fur your bet, I guess it’s a draw—or should I say CLAW?

Hugs and Kittens,

Covenant Cat

Ask Covenant Cat – Approval for Tree Removal?

Cov Cat Haircut

Clearly no one sought MY approval before giving me this awful haircut.

This periodic “advice column” addresses common questions about the Hickory Ridge village covenants and other property maintenance concerns. To keep it interesting, your questions are answered by a local feline who is surprisingly well-versed in covenant issues. This cat may or may not be an overweight orange tabby named Boo Boo that lives with the Village Manager. Send your burning questions to jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org.

Dear Covenant Cat:

My neighbor is having some trees removed. How can I find out if they got permission from the Resident Architectural Committee (RAC) to remove these?

                                   -Curious on Cricket Pass

 

Dear Curious:

I am always curious myself when people remove trees. They’re so fun to climb—why would anyone want to get rid of one? If you see trees being cut down, you can call the village office with your neighbor’s street address to see if they got RAC approval. (You can do this with any exterior change, actually.) That being said, there are several cases in which trees can be removed without prior RAC approval. Homeowners do not need to apply before removing a tree if:

  1. The tree is dead.
  2. The tree is less than 6 inches in diameter (at two feet above ground level).
  3. There is only one tree being removed, regardless of size, and no other trees have been removed from the property within the last calendar year.
  4. Up to 2 trees may be removed, regardless of size, when they are within 15 feet of the house.

If it doesn’t meet one of these exceptions, an exterior alteration application is required. If you want to remove trees but aren’t sure whether or not you need to apply first, call the village office — they can help! You want to be pawsitively sure about this before you start up your chainsaw, because the village can require you to plant replacement trees if you remove healthy trees without approval.