Hickory Ridge Village Center Redevelopment

Hickory Ridge Village Center Redevelopment

On December 7, 2015, Kimco realty notified the Hickory Ridge Village Board of its intent to redevelop the Hickory Ridge Village Center. This marks the beginning of the lengthy “Village Center Redevelopment-Major” process developers are required to follow according to the  Howard County Zoning Regulations, Section 125.J.

Since that initial meeting, Kimco Realty has hosted the required Village Center Concept Planning Workshop, which was held on February 18 at Atholton High School. Meeting minutes and Kimco’s written responses to the comments and questions received at that meeting will be made available once the Village Board has received them.

The next step in the Village Center Redevelopment process will happen on March 23, 2016. Kimco will host the first of two required pre-submission community meetings at 7 pm in the Atholton High School cafeteria. Residents are encouraged to attend, as this is one of your key opportunities to comment on Kimco’s proposed plan and suggest changes to improve it. After this meeting, a second pre-submission meeting will be scheduled, at which Kimco will present their revisions to the redevelopment plan based on community input.

If you live in Hickory Ridge, please do what you can to participate in the redevelopment process. Attend community meetings and share your views with the Village Board. You are being given the opportunity to have an impact on determining the future of the Hickory Ridge Village Center. Seize it!

If you have questions about the redevelopment process, please visit our dedicated web page for more information. You can also direct questions to the Village Manager by phone (410-730-7327) or e-mail.

 

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5 Reasons why FALL Family Bingo Night is Awesome

Friday, September 25 is another fabulous Family Bingo night at The Hawthorn Center. This is an awesome thing to do with your kids. Here are 5 good reasons to come play with us this Fall.

1. It’s super-cheap. Bingo cards are 5 for $1.oo. Drinks are $.75 each. Bingo daubers are less than $2. Snacks are FREE. Yes, free. All the cheese curls, pretzels, and popcorn your kids can eat for FREE. It’s so cheap, you can bring your kids’ friends and look like a hero to their parents.

2. Your kids (and you) will love the prizes. We have NEW prizes, plus the stuffed animals, notepads, and pencils that kids love. And when kids win, they get to go CHOOSE their prize from the winner’s table. How cool is that? Not like those school fun fairs where they just hand you a plastic top or Chinese finger trap. Here, you have the power to choose your reward. We have some nifty prizes for adults too. And there’s always CASH for winners to boot.

3. It gets you out of watching another LAME family movie with the kids. Seriously. Every family movie EVER was watched in my house over the summer because the basement was the coldest room in the house. If you have started watching those painful Disney sequels on Netflix (Hunchback of Notre Dame II, anyone?) you need to STEP AWAY FROM THE TV. Get out of the house and do something as a family that doesn’t involve a screen.

4. It teaches your kids important skills. Okay, this is a stretch —  but they do have to listen carefully or they’ll miss the number being called. Plus, since the odds are against them they’ll probably learn about being a good loser and how to handle disappointment. You could also give them a budget for the night and help them decide how to spend it. It’s almost like school, right? Right? But with cookies and soda.

5. BINGO is FUN for adults! Admit it. You secretly love it. The thrill of ALMOST winning every single game combined with the fun of stamping your bingo card with a dauber is good, old-fashioned, corny fun. Besides, you can’t attend frat parties anymore and you can’t afford a babysitter, so come on down.

Friday, September 25 at The Hawthorn Center. No reservations required — just show up! We start playing at 7:30 pm.

We will have a dauber with your name on it. 🙂

bingo

Covenant Cat: Compliance Concerns

This periodic “advice column” addresses common questions about the Hickory Ridge village covenants and other property maintenance concerns. To keep it interesting, your questions are answered by a local feline who is surprisingly well-versed in covenant issues. This cat may or may not be an overweight orange tabby named Boo Boo that lives with the Village Manager. Send your burning questions to jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org.

Dear Covenant Cat:

I just put my house on the market and my real estate agent says I need a Letter of Compliance. But I’m planning to sell my house as is — do I still need one?

                                   -Seller on Satinwood

Boo Boo Shoe (2)

Covenant Cat carefully inspects a dirty shoe while he sleeps.

Dear Seller :

A Letter of Compliance is not required to sell your home, but it is a very valuable tool fur home sellers in Hickory Ridge. This letter, issued by the Covenant Advisor, verifies that your purroperty is in compliance with the Hickory Ridge Covenants.

To obtain a Letter of Compliance, the purroperty owner must complete a brief request form, which is available on the village’s web site or at their office. The Covenant Advisor will visit your purroperty, inspecting the home’s exterior fur any maintenance issues and/or unapurroved exterior alterations. If the home is non-compliant, she will issue a Letter of Non-Compliance describing the violations. Once these have been addressed, she will reinspect the purroperty and issue the Letter of Compliance. This is a free service provided by the village.

Any  covenant violations at your home become the responsibility of the new owner when the purroperty changes hands, so savvy home buyers often request a Letter of Compliance from the seller as part of their purrchase contract. For this reason, many agents tell sellers that it is “required” fur homes sold in Columbia. However, there is no legal requirement to have a Letter of Compliance unless the buyer has placed it in their contract.

If you are selling your home “as is,” you may still want to request a Letter of Compliance. If a Letter of Non-Compliance is issued, you can share it with the buyers so they have a record of the violations they will inherit when they purrchase your home. Good luck!

Hugs and Kittens,

Covenant Cat

Covenant Cat: Expecting Inspections?

Covenant Cat

Covenant Cat inspects the back of his eyelids after responding to today’s inquiry.

This periodic “advice column” addresses common questions about the Hickory Ridge village covenants and other property maintenance concerns. To keep it interesting, your questions are answered by a local feline who is surprisingly well-versed in covenant issues. This cat may or may not be an overweight orange tabby named Boo Boo that lives with the Village Manager. Send your burning questions to jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org.

Dear Covenant Cat:

I think several houses on my street look run down. When will the village office conduct an annual inspection of homes for covenant violations?

-Impatient on Iron Frame

Dear Impatient:

Unfurtunately, the village office does NOT conduct regular inspections of properties in Hickory Ridge. They simply don’t have the time or resources to do so. The covenant enforcement purrocess in Hickory Ridge is “complaint-driven.” This means that the village relies on residents to report covenant violations to the office. If you report a possible covenant violation, the village office must follow up on it. All complaints are considered anonymouse, and you can infurm the village of violations in writing, by phone, by e-mail, or in purrson at the village office. Once the office receives a complaint, the Covenant Advisor will visit the property in question to verify that a violation exists. If so, the covenant enforcement purrocess begins. Please don’t wait to report a problem; the sooner you let the village office know about violations, the more quickly they can be addressed. Lingering violations make the neighborhood look unsightly.

Village-Wide Yard Sale this Saturday, September 13!

This Saturday from 8 am – 12 pm, residents throughout Hickory Ridge will be holding yard sales! Look for RED ribbons on street signs in addition to the typical yard-sale signs. Below is a list of streets that are participating BY NEIGHBORHOOD:

CLARY’S FOREST:

  • Birdsong Pass
  • Blue February Way
  • Blue Flag Way
  • Bridlerein Terrace
  • Flywheel Court
  • Gold Needle Way
  • Harmel Drive
  • Iron Frame Way
  • Little Patuxent Parkway
  • Lonetree Court
  • Morningmist Court
  • New Country Lane
  • Sleepy Horse Lane
  • Watch Chain Way

CLEMENS CROSSING:

  • Frostwork Row
  • Harpoon Hill
  • Martin Road
  • Sebring Drive
  • Springing Step
  • Whitewasher Way

HAWTHORN:

  • Bright Plume
  • College Square
  • Cordage Walk
  • Golden Hook
  • Plaited Reed
  • Resting Sea
  • Slender Sky
  • Sunny Spring

Please see below for a map of the village. The yard sale will be held RAIN OR SHINE! Happy bargain hunting!

 

Map of Hickory Ridge

Family Pool Party Pictures (and more on Flickr)

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We are now on Flickr! So many people asked for pictures from Wednesday night’s pool party that we thought it would be a great idea to make it easy to share them with you. Share your comments and tags, and feel free to download any images you want. Please keep in mind that these photos are copyrighted material belonging to the Hickory Ridge Community Association, so behave accordingly!

Sing a Song of Sixpence (Tot Lot)

tot lot 1

What the Sixpence/Buglenote tot lot looks like today.

If you live in Hickory Ridge, you may be aware that a community treasure is in danger of being torn down. The CA-owned tot lot behind Sixpence Circle and Buglenote needs work. So we fix it, right?

It’s not that simple.

This particular tot lot is unique in several ways. First, it is the only CA tot lot that was designed by someone who wasn’t a CA employee. That man was Fred Jarvis. A landscape architect who worked for Land Design/Research (LDR) back in the early Columbia days, Fred lived on Buglenote in a house of his own design. He designed the tot lot on his own, incorporating some very cool play features. CA built it from his design.

What else makes this tot lot unique? Jarvis’ design — that’s what. Visit this shade-covered playground yourself. It doesn’t look like any other tot lot in Columbia. It’s got that 70’s groove to it (it was designed and installed between 1976 and 1979). It also has things you won’t find anywhere else in Columbia — a wooden “wobbly bridge,” for one. Best of all (at least in my opinion), there is a tree growing up through the fort. You feel like you’re really in a tree house! How cool is that for kids?

Wobbly Bridge

The wobbly bridge at the Sixpence/Buglenote tot lot

So why can’t it be repaired? Because the CPSC safety standards for playgrounds have changed — a lot — since 1979. CA policy requires that their tot lots meet the current safety standards. They can’t knowingly leave it as is if it needs work for liability reasons. Has anyone ever fallen and sued? Nope. Is it likely that anyone will? Nope. But we live in a litigious world and CA doesn’t want to take chances. I get that.

So what can we do? I don’t know, exactly. The village has explored ways to classify this tot lot as historic, pleaded its case to CA staff, offered suggestions for “play at your own risk” signage, and more.

That’s where you come in. Share your stories and pictures of this tot lot if you have them. Offer your suggestions. Share this with people you know who might care.

If the Sixpence/Buglenote tot lot ultimately has to be redesigned, so be it. But the Village Board is going to do everything in our power to save this community treasure first. Because that’s what a village does — helps build (and protect) the community, advocates for residents, and shares information.

Will you help us?

Share. Like. Comment. Email.

Thanks.

Email me at jduvall@hickoryridgevillage.org if you want more info on this issue.

Photos shared by readers:

Kids on bridge

A photo taken 6-7 years ago by Sixpence Circle resident Lisa.